Our Backyard: A Cat, Bird Nests, and An Open Well

backyard

This morning I decided to go “take a walk” to our backyard. The outdoor kitty that I started feeding and now sleeps in our porch, accompanied me.

catporch1
Outdoor kitty in our porch.

We walked to the back, and he was clearly in his element.

backyardcat

backyardcat1

He quickly got into “outdoor mode” and started “looking for prey”, attacking the grass, and hiding.

backyardcat2 backyardcat3

backyardcat4

Then we went to the shade and chilled for a bit. Good idea. (The clouds were moving around covering and uncovering the sun.)

backyardcat5

backyardcat6

The he walked further back. Can you see him on the small path? And I decided to take a closer look at the open well on the left.

open well pendant nests

It is really deep. Good thing it is towards the back of the backyard. The most interesting part of it is the bird nests.

open well pendant nests

open well pendant bird nests

These nests are called pendant nests which are woven by weaver birds. Many of the weaver birds breed colonially and build their nests together for protection from predators. These nests are usually found near water bodies, hence their location in an open well.

open well pendant nest open well pendant nest

There is even one built on this big cable across the well, which I have no idea what it is for.

butterfly

birdnest
Pendant bird nest in progress.

You can see a blurry-moving weaver bird with a yellow head next to the nest on the above picture. I wish I had better pictures of the birds but they flew away as I approached the well.

lasercat

This one is from the night before, when kitty (who has been really hard to name) turned into laser-eyes cat and showed me how he climbs trees and I got attacked by mosquitoes.

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3 thoughts on “Our Backyard: A Cat, Bird Nests, and An Open Well

  1. I have seen these birds here in Sindh,Paksitan…. They have the same pattern, black with yellow head…. they make nest like you shown here, those nest were bounded to 3-4 supporting branches of bushes/plants

    1. Nice! … I am not 100% sure, but I think he is a male. My guess comes from looking at his behind, and it’s not that clear haha, even after googling it. But I’m pretty sure he’s a male. He acts like a male too; he’s very territorial, very playful, a little aggressive, so…

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